To The Whetstone: On State Coercion and Oppression

How contradictory it is that citizens of Liberal Democracies hold a number of freedoms, rights and liberties, and yet live simultaneously within a legalised nexus of mass surveillance the likes of which the Stasi could only have imagined in their wildest of phantasmic dreams. This is also before discussing even the prowess of social media providers, whose influence and data-harvesting slides through legal loopholes and committee-led critique like a draft through Swiss cheese.

Standing on All That Is Yet In The Past: Thoughts Towards a Purely Political Hermeneutics

To focus on interpreting political texts alone is of course an act of political exegesis. Nonetheless, does this make it a mode of political hermeneutics? The simple answer is no. Although to interpret the discourse surrounding politics is itself a political act by engaging in how we broadly understand our collective action, this is still not political hermeneutics proper. To interpret the action of the civic association is political hermeneutics.

On Animation and ‘The Story’: Interpreting Kubo and The Two Strings

For many, animation is an art form indistinct from cartoons, and as such has developed a dubious consensus amongst many that the art of animation is restricted to the entertainment of children. Indeed, perhaps this tells us more about ourselves and how we understand Art, in addition to how the medium of art is bound with certain notions of prejudice and prejudgement, than animation itself. Although the widespread assumption that animation is exclusively for children may have arisen because of the paradigm forged by Disney, it is the purpose of this piece to dispel such a myth.

Michael Oakeshott, Rationalism and ‘The Sovereignty of Technique’: A Textualist Reading of ‘Rationalism in Politics’

At the crux of the essay, Oakeshott takes a critical stance against what he pens as ‘modern rationalism’, judiciously investigating the connection between modern utopian thinking, ‘reason’, ‘knowledge’ and political action. Consequently, this essay has become a seminal text in the fields of political theory and political philosophy, hence, warranting an exhaustive reading.

Cutting it Closer: On Gillette and Social Politics

The ‘New Spirit’ of Capitalism that Zizek discusses, and that Gillette illustrates, can be marked as the embodiment of Capitalism’s remarkable capacity to revolutionise itself so to continue the accumulation of Capital. The adage of a cultural-value to the commodity form is but the nub of this revolution – one can now consume ethically, the very critique that befell Capitalism in the last century.

Some Initial Thoughts on Birth and The Human Condition

It begins with birth. Each of us is thrown into the world at any single given point of our species’ history. It so happens to be that the moment of our birth is our point of entry into this world. Although we are conceived, carried and thought of before our birth, this is the moment of our first appearance in the world itself.